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Unlocking Success: Mastering Video Verification for Your Google Business Profile

Unless you have been living under a rock, you probably have noticed that video has become one of the most widely used verification methods for Google Business Profiles (GBPs) over the last year or so.

Tips for Video Verification:

Here’s the most important part about video verification; you need to plan ahead! Your video needs to be a continuous shot and should include the following:

  • Your current location: To show your Google Maps location, capture outside signs, like your street’s name, nearby businesses, or the area around your business.
  • Business or equipment: To show that your business is at this Google Maps location, capture your operations. This can include things like stock for sale, branded equipment, marketing materials, and tools you use to serve your customers.
  • Proof of management: To show that you’re authorized to represent your business, capture your access to employee-only items or areas. This includes things like a cash register, kitchen, storage room, or non-sensitive business documents. You can also use your keys to open your facility.

Video Verification:

Once you have planned out what you are going to show in the video navigate to your Google Business Profile (GBP) on your mobile device. Note: If you start the verification process on a computer, you can continue and complete the verification process by scanning the QR code.

Once you’re logged in on your mobile device, you need to:

  • Tap ‘get verified’ and then ‘capture video.
  • Tap ‘start recording.’ Follow the steps and record your video.
  • Once your recording is complete tap ‘stop recording’ and then ‘upload video.

Video Verification for Service Area Businesses:

We get asked by business owners who work out of their homes and travel to their customers what they should be showing in their verification video.

Here are the things Google wants to see:

  • Tools of the trade
  • Software that you use
  • Use a key to open your home the business registered at,
  • Branded trucks
  • Workspace in the home

The Waiting Game:

All that’s left to do at this point is wait. After you upload your video, Google will review it. Reviews can take up to five business days. If you’re verified, you get a notification.
If the video method doesn’t work, the “Get verified” button will show up and you can try a different verification option.

 

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Colan Nielsen

Colan started in the local SEO world back in 2010 and is also deemed a product expert by Google as a Top Contributor on the Google My Business Forum. He is a contributor to Moz’s famous Local Search Ranking Factors survey and is a former Google MapMaker Regional Lead. Read Colan's full bio here.

This Post Has 5 Comments

  1. Hey, Colan.

    Thanks for the concise and thorough presentation on video verification best practices. Our use cases can by very unique and I’d love your opinion.

    Our marketing agency represents Plain Community businesses exclusively (think Amish, Mennonite, Brethren, etc.). This often means that their use of technology is limited, either by rules/guidelines or by their historically-limited use of the tools that are permitted. So we struggle mightily with counseling our clients from afar (most are not local to our geography) on how to successfully capture a video for this use.

    We are considering creating a script/input sheet that we can supply as a scope of work doc to a freelancer/Fiver contractor local to the business in question, and have them use the QR code to enter the verification process on our behalf.

    Have you been faced with a similar situation for clients? What do you feel is the best way to solve this problem if the business owner is unable to play a substantive role in creating the video?

    Thanks, as always, for the great content.

  2. Hey, Colan.

    Thanks for the concise and thorough presentation on video verification best practices. Our use cases can by very unique and I’d love your opinion.

    Our marketing agency represents Plain Community businesses exclusively (think Amish, Mennonite, Brethren, etc.). This often means that their use of technology is limited, either by rules/guidelines or by their historically-limited use of the tools that are permitted. So we struggle mightily with counseling our clients from afar (most are not local to our geography) on how to successfully capture a video for this use.

    We are considering creating a script/input sheet that we can supply as a scope of work doc to a freelancer/Fiver contractor local to the business in question, and have them use the QR code to enter the verification process on our behalf.

    Have you been faced with a similar situation for clients? What do you feel is the best way to solve this problem if the business owner is unable to play a substantive role in creating the video?

    Thanks, as always, for the great content.

    Steve

    1. Hi Steve,
      Thanks for sharing your comment. I’m based in Lancaster County, so I’ve done a fair amount of work with the Plain Communities as well. Here’s how we would handle it:

      1. I would always start with someone within the client’s business or network. Do they have an employee who is more comfortable recording the video? Or perhaps their driver? Maybe there’s a vendor, supplier, or even their neighbor who is more tech savvy and can handle recording the video?
      2. I like the idea of hiring a freelancer when all else fails, though it might be more economic if you could tie it into a larger project – say a product photo shoot for their catalog.

      Thanks for following our content!

      – Brandon

    1. Thanks for commenting! The best tip I can give to beginners is to prepare, prepare, prepare. Get all your ducks in a row and even do a mock walk through of the video.

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